From Gunsopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
GUNS·O·PEDIA
Like this site?
Anything you could want to know about guns or related subjects (It's like Wikipedia for your boomstick)
- 5,717 pages as of Wednesday, December 13, 2017.
If it's about guns, gun rights, gun grabbers or any other related subject, sooner or later it's going to be here. Whether it's sniper rifles, shotguns, WWII arms, ammunition or anything else, we're out there scrounging up anything and everything that we can find. Yes, this is something of an ambitious (some would say impossible) project but we're not quitting until we have it all in one place. Have a look around and see some of what our contributors have put together so far.
Featured Article
OOPS!

Well, this is embarrassing.

We don't seem to have an article of the day for this date. Maybe you could help us out and make or suggest one.
(It's fun! trust us.)

Wtf.gif

history page missing

Newest articles
Most popular this month
Food for thought
War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself.
- John Stuart Mill
Blank.gif
Did you know?
  • The 300 Winchester Magnum cartridge was introduced in 1963. With a 150gr bullet, the velocity is 3290 fps and when zeroed at 250 yards shows a 0 - 300 yard rise-to-drop of 2.9" to -3.5"
Recently updated articles
Latest duscussions
Article Of The Moment
Electronic firing refers to the use of an electric current to fire a cartridge, instead of a percussion cap.

In modern firearm designs, a firing pin and percussion cap are used to ignite the propellant in the cartridge and propels the bullet forward. Because the firing pin must travel a short distance, this creates a short delay between the user pulling the trigger and the weapon firing, which generally decreases accuracy.

In an electronic-fired firearm however, an electric current is used instead to ignite the propellant, which fires the cartridge as soon as the trigger is pulled.

Electrically primed smallarms cartridges retain the primer which functions in the same way as a conventional primer. Rather than being struck by a firing pin, or equivalent mechanical means, a small electrical current serves to detonate the primer which provides the thermal impulse necessary to ignite the propellant which then deflagrates, producing pressure.

See also

Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox