From Gunsopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
GUNS·O·PEDIA
Like this site?
Anything you could want to know about guns or related subjects (It's like Wikipedia for your boomstick)
- 5,704 pages as of Sunday, August 28, 2016.
If it's about guns, gun rights, gun grabbers or any other related subject, sooner or later it's going to be here. Whether it's sniper rifles, shotguns, WWII arms, ammunition or anything else, we're out there scrounging up anything and everything that we can find. Yes, this is something of an ambitious (some would say impossible) project but we're not quitting until we have it all in one place. Have a look around and see some of what our contributors have put together so far.
Featured Article
OOPS!

Well, this is embarrassing.

We don't seem to have an article of the day for this date. Maybe you could help us out and make or suggest one.
(It's fun! trust us.)

Wtf.gif
What else happened today
  • 1928Swiss target shooter and Olympic medalist Karl Röderer passed away in in Sankt Gallen, Switzerland.
Newest articles
Most popular this month
Food for thought
Remember also that the smallest minority on earth is the individual. Those who deny individual rights, cannot claim to be defenders of minorities.
- Ayn Rand
Blank.gif
Today's Pic
How the liberal media sees the AR15:

AR15 to the media.jpg

Today's video
Did you know?
  • Tikka (and Sako) are now owned by Beretta.
  • Tikka (and Sako) are now owned by Beretta.
Recently updated articles
Latest duscussions
Article Of The Moment
The term Doglock refers to the lock that superseded the true flintlock in both rifles and pistols in the 17th century. Commonly used throughout Europe in the 1600's, it gained popular favor in the British and Dutch military.

Much like the later flintlock devices it contained the flint, frizzen, and pan, yet had an external catch as a half cock safety, known as the "dog". This added safety to the firearm in that it would not accidentally go off "half-cocked". This fell out of favor with the British before 1720. Later flintlocks would contain no such catch.[1]

References

  1. Blackmore, Howard L. British Military Firearms, 1650-1850. Greenhill Pr, 1994.
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox